Nerd Love Works

I feel like bragging about my folks today. If anyone ever wondered where my nerdiness comes from, it is most definitely from my parents. They may seem normal to most, but deep down they are the truest nerds that have ever walked the planet.

My mother is a Trekkie. My father is a Star Wars fan. I don’t know what the name is for that. Star Warsian? I don’t know. Neither does he, so he just says that he likes Star Wars. The two have some good banter on the topic, most often happening while we are watching one of the two shows. Dad says that Star Trek is too boring. Mum says that Star Wars is just mindless fighting. It’s like the South Pole and North Pole under the same roof. And yet I know for sure that whoever I get married to, I would want my marriage to look like theirs. They basically met through nerdiness, because my Mum wasn’t really interested in my Dad at all before they started dating. She thought he was just a big brawn-before-brain kind of guy. But she learned that he was far more than that. There’s more to this, but that’s a story for another time.

But there is one thing that brings them together. What is that? J.R.R. Tolkien. When we were eight, my Mum read The Hobbit to us at night. When we were thirteen, we were finally allowed to watch the Lord of the Rings trilogy with Dad, and every year, without fail, we sit down to give it a watch. I can’t think of a single year that we have not taken the time to do it, even while I am in college.

My parents were the first ones to watch the first “The Hobbit” movie, not me. I got the review of the film from my mum the next day while I was trying to study.

And when my parents heard that I was writing a fantasy book, it was as though their dreams came true. Both my Mum and my Dad have been keeping tabs on it the whole time, and have even helped make many of the creatures and some plot twists.

So if you ever feel like your nerd romance will never work out, take my parents as an example. It totally does, and they’ve raised some epic children as well if I do say so myself.

The moral of this story? Being yourself is the best thing you can ever be. If you want to get a true soul mate for life, don’t be afraid to show who you are. It might be pretty awesome.

The Return of Facebook!

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Hey, all! I’m sorry that I haven’t been very busy on here recently, but here’s an exciting new thing for you guys to get a hold of! Some of you know that I am on Twitter. But now I’m on Facebook as well! There was always the book page, but now there’s a distinct fan page for this WordPress account (and, therefore, one for me)! It’s called “Gabriel to Earth: the Fanpage”. Maybe it’s too wordy, but…

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The Return of Facebook!

Hey, all! I’m sorry that I haven’t been very busy on here recently, but here’s an exciting new thing for you guys to get a hold of! Some of you know that I am on Twitter. But now I’m on Facebook as well! There was always the book page, but now there’s a distinct fan page for this WordPress account (and, therefore, one for me)! It’s called “Gabriel to Earth: the Fanpage”. Maybe it’s too wordy, but hey! It works.

On there, you can actually message me, see stuff from my Twitter (soon, not just yet), get even MORE stuff than you’ll see on here, and just generally find awesome nerdiness. Whew! So excited!

To like us, just follow this link here ( https://www.facebook.com/GabrieltoEarth ) and give us a like! Let’s goooo!

Making a Language: Part 1

So, as the comments section requested language, I’m going to do it until somebody either complains or they ask for another thing. This is one the greatest things I’ve done in a very long time. I don’t want to disgrace his name by putting myself on his level… but I feel kind of like Tolkien. Admittedly, his language is probably going to stay forever cooler than mine, but it’s still fun, and throughout this series I may make drastic changes to the way it’s written.

I was inspired by Chinese pictographs for this particular language. I saw one particular picture that meant something, and then if you drew it multiple times, it meant something else. Well, my language is not going to be quite that complicated. No worries there. The connection works well in my mind.

You’ve already seen one word written in this language. I will show it below, although this is a slightly old diagram. It’s close enough to current that I’ll show it. There are some differences for how I recently approached this. In the original style, as in this style, it’s split up into three sections: a tail, a body and a center. I haven’t fully decided what to do with the centers.

This is how it works for now: The more complicated a concept is, the more complicated it is to draw it. For example, this word does not mean “air”. This word means “wind”. If this were the word for air, it would not have the tail portion, which means “moving”. It would just have the body. The body represents the main idea of the word, rather than the main sound. (Most letters do have a sound that reminds the reader of the idea, however.) Tails are something like adverbs and adjectives in English. Is give support to the body. Therefore, with the tail, it translates to “moving air”. Basically, wind.

For now, because of the added meaning to the tails, the centers do not have the same use. I will likely use them just to differentiate verbs and nouns. For instance, reversing the inner curve may change this word’s meaning from “wind” to “blew”. And this is where the hard decisions comes in.

It seems wrong to me to have the nouns and the verbs look so nearly the same. I’m worried this’ll make the language too boring to look at. Sadly, for language, it seems to be function over form. As an artist, this bothers me, but I have to work with it.

The greatest problem of the hieroglyphics language is simply having to create so many words. In the end, I may have to simply reduce it to representing the sounds. It’s pretty sad, but I’ll live. Oh well.

And as most of this has been implied before, here’s a new thing for you. As I said, the descriptors sometimes sound like what they’re representing. In this case, the letter for moving/rushing has a hard “h” sound. That’s right, the first letter for wind sounds like a sigh. I thought it worked.

That’s it for today, tune in… I don’t know when. I’ll probably make this a weekly thing. So, let me know what you thought of this, and if I should keep doing it. Thanks for reading such a long one today!