(Late) Monthly Read n’ Review: “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” by Neil Gaiman

Good heavens, this book is incredible.

I finished this book in a matter of literally two hours, because I loved it so, so much. I have very few words on this book, just because I don’t think I can explain adequately how incredible it is through any words made up to this point. But I’ll try.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane is rather short for a novel – 170 pages. I can’t say for sure whether I would like it to be any longer. It isn’t any less of a book because of its shortness. It’s something like a thirty-pound box that holds only one cubic foot of space.

My mind was being consistently expanded/blown to pieces as I was reading. The book uses mythos, theoretical physics and philosophy and combines them near-flawlessly. It’s often a bit confusing, but it’s not meant to be fully understood. It is, after all, from the viewpoint of a child.

**SPOILER WARNING**

The only flaw I could find was the hint near the end that a certain character did not exist and had only been a figment of the main character’s imagination. This, I think, was an attempt to make a point about human memory. However, certain scenes in the book require that a third lady exist. It seemed like a bit of a last-minute decision that we’re not supposed to question. Strange.

**END OF SPOILERS**

Still, it’s absolutely incredible and I would recommend this to everyone who enjoys a good grown-up fantasy story.

Book Review: “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” by Neil Gaiman

Good heavens, this book is incredible.

I finished this book in a matter of literally two hours, because I loved it so, so much. I have very few words on this book, just because I don’t think I can explain adequately how incredible it is through any words made up to this point. But I’ll try.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane is rather short for a novel – 170 pages. I can’t say for sure whether I would like it to be any longer. It isn’t any less of a book because of its shortness. It’s something like a thirty-pound box that holds only one cubic foot of space. 

My mind was being consistently expanded/blown to pieces as I was reading. The book uses mythos, theoretical physics and philosophy and combines them near-flawlessly. It’s often a bit confusing, but it’s not meant to be fully understood. It is, after all, from the viewpoint of a child.

**SPOILER WARNING**

The only flaw I could find was the hint near the end that a certain character did not exist and had only been a figment of the main character’s imagination. This, I think, was an attempt to make a point about human memory. However, certain scenes in the book require that a third lady exist. It seemed like a bit of a last-minute decision that we’re not supposed to question. Strange.

**END OF SPOILERS**

Still, it’s absolutely incredible and I would recommend this to everyone who enjoys a good grown-up fantasy story.

Monthly Read n’ Review: Frank Peretti’s “Monster”

Monthly Read n’ Review: Frank Peretti’s “Monster”. #review #thriller #horror

monster

This is the very first of an all-new regular monthly post, the Monthly Read n’ Review. Today, I decided to ignore all the other wonderful options and talk about the book that got me hooked on the horror genre: Frank Peretti’s Monster. Book Summary: More terrifying than any nightmare, something has scathed a very real path through the Idaho hills, paving it in blood and echoing screams. It lives,…

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Monthly Read n’ Review: Frank Peretti’s “Monster”

This is the very first of an all-new regular monthly post, the Monthly Read n’ Review. Today, I decided to ignore all the other wonderful options and talk about the book that got me hooked on the horror genre: Frank Peretti’s Monster.

Book Summary: More terrifying than any nightmare, something has scathed a very real path through the Idaho hills, paving it in blood and echoing screams. It lives, it hunts, and it’s just getting started. This time, the monster is real.

Continue reading “Monthly Read n’ Review: Frank Peretti’s “Monster””

Monthly Book Review Coming!

I have a saying. You should read a book for every ten selfies you take. Well, I don’t take many selfies, but I haven’t been into reading too much recently, either. So we’re going to change that! Once a month, along with all my writing posts, you’re going to get a full book review!

I haven’t decided what the first one will be. It’ll either be one of the many Neil Gaiman books I have lying around or Pilgrim’s Progress, which I just got in the mail today. Still not sure. But it’s a comin’! So watch for my first book review coming July 1, 2015!

Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard (REVIEW)

thebooker:

image

Rating: ★★

Add it to your Goodreads shelf

Published: February 2015
Genre: Fantasy, Dystopian, Young Adult Fiction

Buy it via Book Depository (International)

Source: Bookworld (Reader Rewards)

In a nutshell: A very hyped book that fell flat for me. 

The poverty stricken Reds are commoners, living under the rule of the Silvers, elite warriors with god-like powers.

To Mare Barrow, a 17-year-old Red girl from The Stilts, it looks like nothing will ever change. Mare finds herself working in the Silver Palace, at the centre of
those
she hates the most. She quickly discovers that, despite her red blood,
she possesses a deadly power of her own. One that threatens to destroy
Silver control.

But power is a dangerous game. And in this world divided by blood, who will win?

Red Queen is one of the many hyped books that have been published this
year. Lately I don’t seem to really love a lot of popular YA fantasy or
dystopian novels, but I can’t help my curiosity. I definitely understand
the appeal of this one, but I was quite wary going into it too.
Honestly if I hadn’t gotten a copy for review, I might not have read it.
In a sense I’m glad that I’ve finally been able to form my own opinion
on it. I’d be lying if I said that I enjoyed Red Queen. It’s not the
worst book that I’ve ever read, but for me it wasn’t particularly
anything too extraordinary.

The first book in a planned trilogy,
Red Queen has elements of a dystopian novel while fundamentally being a
fantasy novel. There’s X-Men-like powers and a revolution, with a love
triangle/romance to top it all off. Basically in the world, everyone’s
place in society is defined by their blood. The Reds are commoners,
while the Silvers rule and have god-like powers. The protagonist Mare
Barrow is a Red who discovers that, despite her blood, she has powers of
her own.

It all sounds a lot like other books and it didn’t
feel like anything too unique for me. In a way I’d describe it as a
mash-up of different books, including The Hunger Games, The Selection,
Divergent, Red Rising, Throne of Glass and The Grisha. Red Queen will –
and does – appeal to the same audience who enjoyed those books. There’s
lots of books out there with similar vibes to others but I picked up on
it a few times throughout. There were specific elements that almost
jolted me from the story because I got a big [insert book title] here
vibe. I think this is both because of the book and my bias towards books
that are/feel like something special. It’s not the definite thing that
prevented me from liking the book, but it’s something that I wanted to
mention. Other readers noted the similarities but didn’t care, others
were more distracted by it – I guess that we’re all going to differ in
that way.

I honestly didn’t care for the characters and there
was no one in particular that I really liked. This is going to sound
cheesy but I appreciate characters in books that seem to come alive as
I’m reading, whereas I don’t feel like the ones in Red Queen got very
far from the pages. I was missing that ‘real’ aspect to the romance too.
It felt like it just… happened? I’m not into love triangles anyway,
but I didn’t feel much of a spark there. More eye-rolling on my part.

The
main problem with Red Queen for me was how flat it felt. It’s difficult
to describe but I just had this kind of ‘is that it?’ feeling towards
it. I didn’t lose myself in the story – it almost became an effort to
get through. I get why people like it but it didn’t really do anything
for me.